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Gleysson Silva Silva itibaren Saint-Elzéar-de-Bonaventure, QC G0C 2W0, Kanada itibaren Saint-Elzéar-de-Bonaventure, QC G0C 2W0, Kanada

Okuyucu Gleysson Silva Silva itibaren Saint-Elzéar-de-Bonaventure, QC G0C 2W0, Kanada

Gleysson Silva Silva itibaren Saint-Elzéar-de-Bonaventure, QC G0C 2W0, Kanada

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Across the Nightingale Floor has a beautiful, concise writing style, good characterization, fast pace, and interesting plot. It's main weakness is the ridiculousness of the love-at-first-sight. It makes the characters seem a bit shallow. Warning about the audiobook: I listened to this book on CD. There are two readers — a man for the voice of Takeo, and a woman for the voice of Kaede. The man is an excellent reader with a lovely voice (he's got the oriental speech sounds just right). I think his reading made me sympathize with Takeo more than I would have if I had read the book in print format. But the female reader was terrible — she speaks slowly and too distinctly, as if she's reading to kindergartners. This was extremely annoying! Fortunately, most of the book is written with Takeo's narration, so her reading didn't ruin it for me. Also, I think, as an American reader, I might have benefited from actually seeing the oriental names, rather than only hearing them. It took me a while to distinguish between some of the names because they were all unfamiliar to me and ... (sorry) they all sounded too similar at first. If you're planning to read this series, read it in print, not by audio. Read more Lian Hearn book reviews at Fantasy literature.

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It is often an easy matter to say "I liked this book" or "I didn't like this book", but sometimes the simplest descriptions don't always apply. For instance, we may not LIKE the road we're forced to travel in life, but we may LIKE where the hardships lead us. In "Where the Boys Are", many of the characters are undeniably hard to like and sometimes too "holier than thou" to be tolerated ... but, that's okay ... since they end up leading us somewhere we needed to go. That destination is a realization that we have to do it all wrong before we ever learn to do it anywhere near right.