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Samed itibaren Matkules pagasts, Letonya itibaren Matkules pagasts, Letonya

Okuyucu Samed itibaren Matkules pagasts, Letonya

Samed itibaren Matkules pagasts, Letonya

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Bitter Music music itself gets five stars. If you read between the lines you get one of the most revealing artist bios ever.The other essays fluctuate between two and three stars.

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** spoiler alert ** *SPOILERS* “’O wonder! …How many goodly creatures are there here! How beauteous mankind is!’… ‘O brave new world that has such people in it’” (138). When we read this, we no longer think of Shakespeare’s The Tempest. Instead, we think of Aldous Huxley’s utopia, Brave New World. ¬The book paints a consumer utopia, where people live in a state of hedonism. All emotions, unpleasant or intense, are suppressed in favor of being in a state of constant drug-induced pleasure. The premise reflects the confrontation between Huxley and the man’s disillusionment with religion, art, sex, and politics. The society of Brave New World takes this to the next degree, disdaining religion, regressing the nature of sex, and eliminating art and politics. It also comes into conflict with another Huxley’s beliefs: the pursuit of self-transcendence while still being an active socialite. In Brave New World, self-transcendence is seen as selfish, and most social interactions are immature. Brave New World shows the issue of a society that is constantly happy through the usage of a character, John, who, unlike many of the other characters of Brave New World, does not suppress his emotions. John is not raised in the society of Brave New World. Instead, he lives on a reservation filled with people deemed savage by the general populace. He is raised with ideas of religion, of virtue and the works of William Shakespeare. He constantly pursues his path of self-transcendence. His ability to feel, as well as his old fashioned virtues allows the reader to relate him, and put themselves in his shoes. There many things that define human society, including religion, art, and politics. In Brave New World, these concepts twisted in 1984. Religion venerates not gods, but men. It worships Ford and sometimes Freud, but mentions any trace of god is frowned upon. When John talks about religion, the other characters laugh at him for talking what they deem as “uncivilized”. Art is no longer present in society. Writing has become institutionalized and has adopted a new name: Emotional Engineering. Books are only restricted to non-fiction. The works of Shakespeare are no longer available for the general public, much to. Films are restricted to pornographic smut. Politics are practically nonexistent. The world is controlled by a select few with absolute power. Everyone else too preoccupied with seeking their own pleasure to look into any politics. People are no longer concerned with anything other than feeling good. Their lives revolve around feeling good. They take soma, a drug that provides temporary self-transcendence. They are not willing to make the sacrifices necessary for actual self-transcendence. Instead, they are willing to take the temporary solution. The result is detachment from reality. They lose all ability in social matters. Even without soma, they are like children in terms of social interaction. They are unable to cope with dealing with others. Reading Brave New World is exposing yourself to the problems of constant happiness. You realize that without the struggle for happiness, happiness becomes empty. The reason is because you are able to see through the eyes of the book’s straight man John. It is through John that you are able to see the importance of the message. If given the choice, you should read this book. Its provides an insight that is second to none, on a system of society so many are willing to judge as perfect.