leahpatrice

Leah Kirsten Kirsten itibaren Turaevo, Respublika Tatarstan, Rusya itibaren Turaevo, Respublika Tatarstan, Rusya

Okuyucu Leah Kirsten Kirsten itibaren Turaevo, Respublika Tatarstan, Rusya

Leah Kirsten Kirsten itibaren Turaevo, Respublika Tatarstan, Rusya

leahpatrice

This is the first book from these two authors, partners in writing, research, and life. I really, really loved their second book about the history of the French language, but man! I think I forgot what a slog that was until right now. The first section of this, their first book, is a really, really great exploration of what makes the French different from everyone else. A lot of their insights were new and yet completely logical (and more than a little amusing). The second section of the book goes into the nitty-gritty of France's political and economic structure, complete with historical explanations, and it gets more than a little dry. That first section is totally worth a look, though. It occurred to us that the French really are the aborigines of France. The word aborigine is usually associated with primitive peoples now, but it really just means "original." The ancestors of the French go back several ice ages. They are not a people who, like North Americans, arrived in the midst of a primitive culture, erased it, and started over. They have always been there. There was plenty of upheaval throughout French history, but no definitive break with the past. In America, the parallel would be something like this: the Indians won, not the cowboys, and the Aztecs went on to create a country that sent rockets into orbit and delivered the mail twice a day, but still celebrated human sacrifice on the stairs of the pyramids. (That's from the first section.)