gzoggia

Giulia Zoggia Zoggia itibaren Umaria, Uttar Pradesh 231211, Hindistan itibaren Umaria, Uttar Pradesh 231211, Hindistan

Okuyucu Giulia Zoggia Zoggia itibaren Umaria, Uttar Pradesh 231211, Hindistan

Giulia Zoggia Zoggia itibaren Umaria, Uttar Pradesh 231211, Hindistan

gzoggia

Bunu beğendim. Sarah Brandt ve Frank Malloy'un sonunda öpüştüğü yerdir. Bazı iyi kıvrımlar ve bazı korkak suçlular. Tamamen eğlenceli.

gzoggia

Bu kitabı keklerden daha çok seviyorum. Bana nedenini sorma, sadece yapıyorum. Muhtemelen ben ceza için bir obje olduğum için.

gzoggia

If you think you had a fucked up childhood, think again. This memoir is so unbelievable you'll think it's fiction.

gzoggia

** spoiler alert ** When you see this book for the first time, the first thing you notice is the thickness! 1232 (or thereabouts) pages of ONE book! It is not surprising to find that many people put off reading this book because they are put off by the sheer thickness and weight of the book (nicknamed "The Brick")and I myself was in that boat! When I first saw it, my initial thought was "SO MANY PAGES! HOW WILL I READ THIS?!" That was back in 2009 when I first saw the book, not long after discovering the musical. I picked it up and saw the tiny text concealed within and my thought was probably "THIS IS GOING TO BE IMPOSSIBLE TO READ!!!" In my first attempt to read the book (back in 2010 after seeing the musical on stage, and thereafter became desperate to read it) I only got to around page 37 and then thought "nah". Last year I picked it up a second time and only got to around page 87 and then thought "NAH". A few days after my birthday this year (which was when I was given the book)I started reading, and this afternoon I got to page 1232 and thought "YAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAS!" I felt a sense of accomplishment! As time progressed my copy(the movie tie in Norman Denny Translation), I noticed, how deteriorated it was becoming. It's times like these I wish I had a hardback version. (although being me, I begged for the movie tie-in, which is of course a paperback)I found my hands were glued to this thing! Some nights I couldn't put it down and ended up staying up until 2am just to finish the section I was on! There were times where I read it everywhere! In Bed, at School, On the Bus, Outside, in the dressing room etc and not once did I find myself getting bored. So anyway before I start rambling like Hugo himself (and write 3 pages describing the wall/seat I was sitting on whilst reading this thing) I'll get onto the review. The Blurb reads as follows: "The epic novel of redemption, sacrifice, love and suffering..." "Les Misérables, or 'the Wretched', tells the story of ex-convict Jean Valjean, who has spent nineteen brutal years in chains after stealing a loaf of bread. Saved by an act of Christian charity, he is offered a chance of happiness when he encounters the downtrodden Fantine and vows to rescue her daughter, Cosette - but is constantly pursued by the implacable policeman Javert, who will not let him escape his past." "An instant bestseller on publication, Les Misérables weaves together individual stories with turbulent historical events to create a rich, imaginative drama of human life." The book starts off long before the musical does, in the town of Digne, where we get the story of Bishop Myriel (Monsieur Bienvenue). In the musical, the bishop is on stage for around 10 minutes approximately, so before reading, I had no idea what his character was like, what his background was, and I also had no idea that the musical started where the book did not so it surprised me a little. I found Bishop Myriel to be a very well written character, in that he was very likeable and that he led a calm and peaceful life. When it came to the part where Jean Valjean entered Digne, that is when I felt the story picking up! I'll discuss Valjean later on because I have a lot to say about him. Soon the events of 1823 came into play and I was introduced to Fantine, one of the most tragic characters I've ever come across in a book! If only Jean Valjean had known she had a child before she was dismissed. That bit made me feel very sorry for Fantine, how a life so horrible could be made even worse, and then just ended before it could be resolved! Quite as heartbreaking reading it as it is when watching Anne Hathaway portray it! I felt the book got going once it came to the very meaty and very educational section all about the Battle of Waterloo. I dreaded that part because my Mum told me it was long, but when it came to it, I couldn't put it down! thank goodness I have triple frees on a Thursday Morning. I sat and read through that bit non-stop and I finished and the bell went for Geography, so I was relieved, I'd finished it before the bell! The fact Hugo took his time to write out pages of history all over again and then weave the stories into the historical setting, it made for a much more interesting read. Thénardier then finding Colonel Pontmercy and saving him, was a bit I didn't expect, I knew Thénardier was at the field "crawling through the mud" and "picking through the pockets of the english dead" but I didn't know he saved Marius's father's life and was somehow then connected to Marius. In fact I'm going to talk about Master Thénardier now. What an evil character! In the musical he's evil, but in the book he's....eviler? if that's even a word. I couldn't get over how evil he actually was. All that money taking, the disguises, the bribing, the thievery, the jailbreak, the attack on Rue Plumet he was going to do with his gang of thugs. Everything like this made him out to be horrible! A very dislike-able character, I hated him! I've never taken a dislike to any character in a novel as much as I did with Master Thénardier because he was so dishonest and plain cruel! One character I've never really liked in the musical, but I took a liking to when reading the book, was Marius. We know next to nothing about him in the musical, except that he marries Cosette and is saved by Jean Valjean who carries him through the sewers to his safety. His background was fascinating, the relationship with his Grandfather was really sad because of how Gillenormand disowned Marius because of his son Colonel Pontmercy, and how his actions influenced his grandfather's feelings towards him. Poor Marius ends up storming out and then Gillenormand is left alone, and then he believes Marius to be dead. I welled up at the argument they had when he asked Gillenormand to let him Marry Cosette and he declined it. But when Marius is brought to the house from the Barricade, that is when I grew to love the character of Gillenormand! He seemed like your typical loving grandfather once he'd fixed his relationship with Marius. Fauchelevant had a more prominent role in the book than in the musical. I found the bit where he helped Valjean out of the Convent akin to situations you'd find in Ealing Comedy and that was hilarious! A lot more to do in the book than nearly die getting hit by a giant, unrealistic sized cart onstage in the musical. Éponine was just as I expected her to be, but the fact she had a sister and brothers of whom she knew nothing made her situation all the more tragic. Poor soul, loving a man she can never have after only a short time, and the whole running around in bare feet in snow. The poor are very well described by Hugo, and it did give insight into what life would have been like back then, and it was quite scary to think that people lived like that. It did make you feel sorry for her and all the other poor in Paris. Azelma was a grey area, she wasn't really a main character and was only mentioned once or twice so I don't have much to say about her. I found each and every detail of the students at the barricade fascinating! Some of the speeches were long and tedious to read, but finding out what each individual student studied was a nice touch, especially as in the musical, we have no idea what these students do! I loved how Grantaire and Enjolras shared that moment before they died, and many people think that Hugo portrayed Grantaire as being in love with Enjolras, and I can see why they think it. That tender moment before they are shot, was almost heartbreaking. In fact every death covered in the book was heartbreaking, because every time I read about a main character death, I was sad because we'd hear no more about them and in some cases, there was more to be told about them that would never be told. Gavroche's death was one of the most heartbreaking the book aswell as in the film! He was only a young boy of around 9/10 years and he had his whole life ahead of him, and he never got to live it. I thought the moment where he sheltered the two boys, whom he had no idea were his own brothers, inside the elephant of the bastille. That was one moment was one of the best in the book in my opinion. It showed that Gavroche knew how to live in the streets and was about to teach these two how to as well, and when they disappear, Gavroche really has nothing, which is why he joins the barricade lot. Another moment to tug at the heartstrings was when Gavroche died, Hugo in the next chapter told us of where the two boys had gone and how they were suffering, having not eaten for days. It was a beautiful moment because it contrasted between the living urchins, and the dead one, which showed the living urchins to be struggling so might as well have been as dead as Gavroche was, and when that rich man throws away the food to the swans and they get to it first, was another one of those moments where Hugo wanted you to feel sympathetic to the poor. Cosette... well she wasn't exactly the most likeable of characters, to me she seemed a bit, I dunno how to describe it... sort of annoying? I know she's only 14 when Marius first sees her and then she's around 18 when they finally marry. But even at 18, she seems really, annoying. Amanda Seyfreid's casting in the role was perfect, because she played the annoying one. In my opinion, she took Cosette out of the book and gave her life. She's not so annoying as a child, but later on once she's married and she talks about being very angry at Jean Valjean for not addressing her as "tu". It's little things like that that made me dislike her a little. Now onto Jean Valjean. In my opinion Jean Valjean is probably one of the best characters ever created! Every step of his journey, you feel sympathetic and compassionate towards him, having been imprisoned for stealing bread to feed his starving family. Nothing more is said of his family and he never sees them again. Valjean feels almost Christ like in some parts, giving his money to the poor and saving people's lives. Taking a path from the ruthless convict, to the lovable and highly respected Monsieur Madeleine, to the brother of Fauchelevent, and back to Jean Valjean. We read Valjean like it's his whole life that's being told to us, when in reality it's only from his 50th to 80th years that we're seeing in the book. Valjean remains strong through everything that happens to him, keeps himself to himself, looks after Cosette like she was his own daughter. When Jean Valjean collects Cosette from the Thénardiers, he buys her a doll she admires in the window of a shop and then on the journey to Paris, it's like Valjean discovers love for the first time. and both Cosette and Valjean are in the situation that neither of them have ever known love, and now they are together. Of course it's fatherly love he shows towards her but it's still love and that can't be denied. When Cosette is grown up and she witnesses the prisoners being displayed to the public, Valjean recalls that he had been in the same positon only years before and it's quite shocking because it's the first time we see him afraid. Of course he's afraid of Cosette asking questions about his past since he doesn't want to recall it. This part is so powerful because of his fear and guilt, and we feel it at the same time he does, seeing these prisoners being ill-treated as they parade onwards to the galleys. Valjean is also very protective of Cosette, shown when he's aware of Marius having noticed her in the Luxembourg. He deliberately drops a handkerchief which of course Marius picks up. Poor Valjean when he finds out about Marius through Cosette's letter she forgot to tear off the pad. He finally realises he has another burden to carry, hence why he goes to the barricade. I think somewhere inside him he knew that this man was to be his "son" in the future and that is why he carried him through miles of sewer (the sewer description was incredibly interesting!)to his safety. I really felt for Marius when Valjean confessed everything to him, and them Marius decides to shut him out of his life, when Valjean laid down his life for him. Then when the wicked Thénardier reveals who Valjean is and Marius and Cosette witness him die, it's heartbreaking, because Marius has only felt this realisation and now he would never see Valjean again. I felt myself welling up when Valjean was dying, because it seemed so real. (in the film it made me cry so much!) Javert... well what can I say, he was my favourite character before I read the book, and he still is my favourite character now. He's like the complete opposite of Jean Valjean and he's only doing his duty for the law, it's nothing about revenge or getting his own back. Valjean is an escaped convict (twice over after he became 9430) and Javert's job is to get him back behind bars. When Javert realises his power is now nothing compared to the power Valjean had over him at the barricade, he let's Valjean go and then kills himself because he can't live with the fact Valjean let him live and he had done the same, which meant he'd failed in his duty. Such a beautifully tragic and well written character in my eye. He and Valjean are like 1 person (some believe Hugo took himself and split his personalities into these two characters) So to sum up, Les Misérables, is the best book I have ever read in my life. I loved the musical, loved the film, and now I've loved the book as well! If you are a fan of the musical, and haven't read it, you need to! If you have seen the movie and haven't read the book you need to! In fact, if you've seen the musical in any shape or form, it is COMPULSORY that you read this book so you get the full story behind all of the characters you have grown to love in the musical. Some of them will shock you because they are so different to their musical counterparts. So yes, pick up this book, give it a go, and you will love it! It takes a while to get going, but once it does, it's worth every minute! I for one didn't want it to end!