ismailshariff

M Ismail Ismail itibaren Hedrick, IA 52563, Birleşik Devletler itibaren Hedrick, IA 52563, Birleşik Devletler

Okuyucu M Ismail Ismail itibaren Hedrick, IA 52563, Birleşik Devletler

M Ismail Ismail itibaren Hedrick, IA 52563, Birleşik Devletler

ismailshariff

Bu kitabın ilk birkaç sayfası en sevdiğim açıcılar arasında. Ruth Ozeki parlak ve inanılmaz derecede komik. Kitabın sonunun küçük bir pat olduğunu düşünsem de, kitabı hala okuduğum en şaşırtıcı şeylerden biri olarak görüyorum - sadece sonunda sertim çünkü ilk yüzümü çok sevdim muzaffer sona erene kadar yolumu açacağım ve ağlayacağımdan emin olduğum sayfaları , bu başlığı korur). Bu kitapta çok fazla mizah ve kalp ve sade bir yaşam var, beni güldüren, güldüren veya kalbime başka türlü dokunan birçok an.

ismailshariff

While Levy's analysis of the ways in which some women participate in and uphold raunch culture is, at times, quite apt, this book as a whole brushes past the true root of the issue (patriarchy) and in doing so places blame at the wrong placemat. Rather than critiquing the dominant paradigm of power and control, or focusing on oppression, racism or class, Levy focuses on the ways in which women (and sometimes men, who she inacurately identifies as women) can harm other women by perpetuating raunch culture and "acting like men". Though I agree that women should be held accountable for their contributions to a system that perpetuates mysogyny (just as any person of any gender should be) and though I'm sure that it was Levy's intention to write a book that encourages such accountability, I don't believe that this book effectively calls women to action in this ragard. In fact, I think that this book -- when placed in the hands of the wrong person -- could prove dangerous. In Levy's chapter "From Womyn to Bois", she discusses the ways in which female born gender variant people, female born genderqueers and transguys -- all of whom she describes as "bois" -- uphold and perpetuate raunch culture through their actions and behaviors. Levy uses female pronouns for all but one of the differently gendered people she refers to in this chapter (who she seems to have decided is trans enough to warrant appropriate gender pronouns) and belittles their experience in her description of them as promiscuous "lesbians" caught up in the "fad" of testosterone and top surgery. This is transphobia at its finest. Levy's book seems based on very limited, few and far between interviews with randomly selected members of various communities (whose experience she proudly generalizes as indicative of all members of that community). Her research is, in this way, flawed and ineffectual. Her transphobia is frightening and hazardous. This book is intended to be accessible to and appropriate for the average reader, which is why I take such great offense to her denegration of gender variant and trans identified folks. Hidden in amongst a proportedly feminist analysis in true hate-speech mired in disdain for queer culture. This is not a message I want distributed en masse throughout popular culture, for the aforementioned reasons.