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Piero Ardizone Ardizone itibaren Saint-Urbain, QC G0A 4K0, Kanada itibaren Saint-Urbain, QC G0A 4K0, Kanada

Okuyucu Piero Ardizone Ardizone itibaren Saint-Urbain, QC G0A 4K0, Kanada

Piero Ardizone Ardizone itibaren Saint-Urbain, QC G0A 4K0, Kanada

uxable

Okulum bu yaz için sekizinci sınıfa gidiyor çocuklara okurken tavsiye ediyorum, ki bu çok saçma olduğunu düşündüm. Onlar "ALRIGHT !! Resimli kitap!" ve sonra hiçbir şey alamadım. Bence okuduğunuzda en az yirmi yaşında olmalısınız ya da daha gençken okuduysanız, yaşlandığınızda tekrar okumanız gerekir. Aynı şeyi alaycı kuş ve Owen Meany için bir dua öldürmek için. Bu iki sent olacak. Teşekkürler. ;)

uxable

Reminiscent of the ten minutes I spent in the JLP...

uxable

Continuing my attempt to catch up on all of the Star Trek books I've bought but haven't gotten around to yet, just finished Chrysalyis. The basic premise is that Voyager is low on food and stops at a very earth-like planet to scrounge for some food. An away team beams down to the lush gardens riddled with ancient ruins after scanning the planet and finding no life--at least not what we expect as life. There is some kind of energy reading that comes across as a life-force, but it permeates the entire planet and wreaks havoc with Federation technology. Once they've beamed down, the locals make themselves known but seem very friendly. But then a member of the away team collapses for no apparent reason and things start to go wrong from there. Overall, the book was OK. The beginning was a little slow, and there was far too much time spent on repeating things we already knew and expounding on some philisophical ideas. Also, some "insights" into the characters were thrown in here and there and really didn't have anything to do with the main plot and didn't spring from that main plot much either. Character development should come FROM the plot, not just be thrown in for filler, and that's what these felt like. Initially, I was ready to write this one off completely about halfway through. But the real heart of the novel doesn't come until toward the end of the book, and it's much more of an idea than it is anything about Voyager or its crew. The central idea could have been set in nearly any other SF&F universe, not just Star Trek. But the idea was good enough to elevate this book above a write-off. I won't spoil the idea here, but know that the book doesn't really become interesting until the last half/third of the novel.